What is the Opioid Detox Timeline?

What is the Opioid Detox Timeline?

Opioid withdrawals can be life-threatening if not handled with proper medical care. Because of the severity and dangers that opioid withdrawals cause in addicts, they are usually treated in detox with medications that mimic their effects and allow the body to “come down” in a controlled way. Pharmacological drugs such as Methadone and Buprenorphine are used for these methods.

The US is currently undergoing an opioid epidemic that involves drugs such as heroin, oxycodone, codeine, and methadone. It’s estimated that close to 3 million people are battling opioid addiction in the US and nearly 16 million people worldwide.

The timeline of opioid detox commences shortly after the addict has taken the last dose and can last for up to 10 days, or longer in some cases.

Timeline of Opioid Detox

The timeline of opioid detox will be slightly different for each patient, as the length that symptoms will last is dependent on the severity of the addiction, the type of drug, and the way in which the addict consumed it.

Someone who recently picked up an Oxycodone habit will likely have milder withdrawal symptoms than someone who has been consuming heroin intravenously for an extended period.

Typically, addicts can expect to feel mild symptoms of withdrawal anywhere between eight and thirty hours after consuming their last dose progressing as time passes. Symptoms may extend for up to 10 days after the last dose is consumed, milder symptoms may stick around for longer in some cases.

During an opiate detox a patient can expect to:

  • Receive a medical examination
  • Experience withdrawal symptoms
  • Take medication for symptoms
  • Receive around-the-clock support 

24 Hours After the Last Dose

For short-acting opioids such as heroin and codeine, the discomfort will begin as early as eight to twenty-four hours after the last dose. 

If checking into a detox center, the patient can expect to receive a medical examination right away, along with receiving pharmacological opioid management for their withdrawal. 

Methadone and buprenorphine, being the preferred pharmacological option for opioid treatment, will typically be administered in this scenario to help combat the effects of withdrawal. Patients are commonly treated with small doses throughout the detox process.

The first withdrawal symptoms will be mild and progress as time passes.

Some of the first symptoms experienced include:

  • Headaches
  • Irritation
  • Anxiety and cravings
  • Body pains and aches
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Loss of appetite

Two Days After the Last Dose

This period is characterized by the beginning of withdrawal symptoms for patients that consumed long-acting opioids such as oxycodone or hydromorphone. Short-acting opioid patients will experience additional symptoms on the second day such as:

  • Sweating
  • Panic attacks 
  • Nausea 
  • Vomiting 
  • Diarrhea

Three to Six Days After the Last Dose

Days three to six will see the withdrawal symptoms peak for both long-acting and short-acting opioid addicts.

Additional symptoms experienced on days three to six include:

  • Cramps
  • Shivering
  • Fatigue
  • Enlarged pupils

Seven Days After the Last Dose

Patients will finally begin to see their symptoms recede a week after consuming their last dose of opiates.

While the worst may now be behind them, they will now enter a new stage where fatigue, irritability, insomnia, and depression may remain present for a longer time.

Where to Get Help

If you or a loved one is suffering from opiate addiction then you can’t overestimate the need to get help! 

Signing up for a detox program will shelter the addict from the health risks that come with opioid withdrawals, offering the protection and care of competent medical staff.

Now that you know what the detox timeline of opioids is like, it’s time to take action.

Veritas Detox offers opioid detox programs to help you or your loved ones get sober and stay that way.

Help is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas recovery experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. 

Contact Veritas Detox today!

How to Find a Comprehensive Detox Center in Southern California

How to Find a Comprehensive Detox Center in Southern California

Southern California, dubbed the “Rehab Riviera”, is the drug and alcohol rehab capital of America. People from all over the world travel to Southern California in search of recovery, often following the exposure it gets from celebrity patients that attend the riviera’s top treatment centers.

The rehab capital offers a plethora of options for addicts that can make finding the right comprehensive drug and alcohol detox center in California feel like an overwhelming task.

Nevertheless, identifying the right drug and alcohol detox in California is a crucial step in ensuring recovery gets done properly the first time around.

How to Choose the Right Drug and Alcohol Detox Center in Southern California

Where do we start?

A quick google search will easily reveal hundreds of choices for drug and alcohol detox in California, narrowing it down to the one that best fits your situation will be determined by the addict’s circumstances.

Important circumstances to consider when choosing a drug and alcohol detox in California include:

  • The degree of the addiction
  • Need for inpatient or outpatient treatment
  • Insurance
  • Financial situation
  • Addicts treatment needs

The first step in choosing an alcohol or drug detox in California is determining if the addict will need an inpatient or outpatient treatment center.

Inpatient Drug and Alcohol Detox

Inpatient detox facilities provide assistance to patients on-site 24 hours a day. Detox programs are usually offered in blocks of 72 hours, 5-days, 7-days, and 10-days, depending on the severity of the case and the type of substance being abused.

Inpatient alcohol and drug detox in California is usually best suited for those who:

  • Have moderate to severe withdrawal symptoms
  • Don’t have family support at home
  • Don’t have a home to go to
  • Don’t live in a space that’s healthy for recovery
  • Have other medical conditions
  • Have a dual-diagnosis

Outpatient Drug and Alcohol Detox

Outpatient treatments offer patients the ability to go back home while attending treatment, giving them more flexibility and costing less, without receiving attention around the clock. 

Outpatient alcohol and drug detox in California is usually best suited for those who:

  • Have mild to moderate withdrawal symptoms
  • Have a demanding job
  • Have family responsibilities 
  • Need a more economic treatment option and are not experiencing severe withdrawal symptoms

What to Look for in a Drug and Alcohol Detox Center in Southern California

Not all detox programs are created equal, and their services can range from very luxurious to more conservative offerings; however, there are a few factors that separate great treatment centers from those that don’t live up to expectations, regardless of whether their facilities may be luxurious or not.

Those factors include:

  • Outstanding and legitimate staff credentials
  • Onsite medical care
  • Program accreditation by health organizations such as JCAHO or CARF
  • Financing options
  • Support and 12-step programs
  • Tailored recovery solutions
  • Life integration programs
  • Comfortable spaces

Where to Look for a Detox Drug and Alcohol Detox Center in Southern California

Once you have decided what’s most important to you, then it’s time to commence the search. 

There are many sources available online that provide directories to service centers such as the federal SAMHSA treatment directory.

Rather than risk choosing the wrong drug and alcohol detox in California, which could be both costly and dangerous for the addict, it’s best to let the experts guide you.

The admissions team at Veritas Detox is prepared to help you or your loved one get the right personalized detox programs in Southern California.

Their ultra-well-equipped rehab facility is accredited by JCAHO and employs top-notch licensed professionals. Their in-house gym, yoga classes, and gourmet meals will make detox feel more like a breeze.

Get Help Today

If you or a loved one is suffering from addiction and needs drug or alcohol detox in California, then it’s time to get help!Come detox with us. Contact Veritas Detox today for a free consultation.

How Long Does Coke Stay in Your System?

Cocaine ranks second as the most prevalent drug of abuse in the U.S., it’s estimated that around 2.2 million people consume it every year. Along with other illicit drugs, cocaine is part of the U.S. Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) federal workplace drug testing panel, a model panel used by federal agencies and private employers across the country to drug test subjects.

Given the drugs widespread use, and relevance within testing panels, the detection of coke in your system may be of concern for employment, judicial, and treatment matters. For this reason, both addicts and examiners may wonder – how long does cocaine stay in your system? 

If you are suspicious of someone in your organization using cocaine or are worried that your latest weekend adventure will show up in your next drug test then this article is for you!

How Is Cocaine Detected in Your System?

The first thing that needs to be understood about detecting coke in your system is that what subjects are being tested for is metabolites of cocaine, and not the drug itself.

A metabolite is a byproduct of the metabolism of a substance in our body, sort of a left-over our bodies produce, consider for example CO2 as being a metabolite of oxygen consumption.

Most tests identify cocaine by tracing a metabolite called benzoylecgonine; however, there are other metabolites examined, such as cocaethylene, which is a byproduct of cocaine and alcohol when they are consumed together.

The most common tests that check for the use of coke in your system examine urine, blood, saliva, and hair follicles. 

How Long Does Cocaine Stay in Your System?

There are a number of factors that go into determining how long coke stays in your system, physiological factors will provide a short range of variance on test results while the test itself will provide a longer range of variance.

For example, a hair test may provide evidence of cocaine use for much longer than a urine test would. 

Physiological factors that influence how long cocaine stays in your system include:

  • Metabolism
  • Frequency of use
  • Weight of subject
  • Dose
  • Urine pH
  • Concentration of urine
  • Kidney or liver disease

Therefore, to better answer the question – how long does cocaine stay in your system? We need to examine each and every test option available.

How Long Does Cocaine Stay in Your Urinary System?

Urine tests are the most popular type of tests carried out by employers, the judicial system, and treatment centers, primarily due to their affordability and accuracy. 

Cocaine, metabolites leave the body rather quickly, benzoylecgonine and other byproducts may only show up in a urine test for two to four days after consumption; however, habitual users with prolonged use periods may see that time extended for up to two weeks. 

Consuming cocaine with alcohol extends the shelf-life of testing, as cocaethylene tends to hang around in both the blood and urine for much longer than benzoylecgonine.

How Long Does Cocaine Stay in Your Blood and Saliva?

Blood and saliva tests have the least longevity of all the testing categories. Blood tests will usually only trace cocaine and its metabolites for up to 48 hours, the same as with a saliva test.

How Long Does Cocaine Stay in Your Hair?

Cocaine, like other drugs, may remain in the hair follicle for extended periods of time, which makes it the preferred testing method for certain judicial processes and high-security clearance jobs.

A hair test can show coke in your system for up to 90 days, although in some cases of prolonged abuse the trace of cocaine could be around for much longer.

Cocaine Addiction Treatment Options

Cocaine addiction is a complex disease that requires specialized treatment. If you or one of your loved ones is suffering from cocaine addiction, then it’s time to get help.

Veritas Detox offers cocaine detox programs to help you or your loved ones combat cocaine addiction and get the support needed to get and stay sober.

Support is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas’ experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. Contact Veritas Detox today!

What is the Alcohol Detox Timeline?

Alcohol withdrawals can be life-threatening if not handled with proper medical care. For heavy drinkers and alcoholics, withdrawal symptoms may begin shortly after discontinuing a session, typically within eight hours of the last drink, although it may take longer in some cases.

During this period, the alcoholic may experience feelings of discomfort and strong cravings that can make time feel like it’s slowing down for them. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms usually peak within 24 to 72 hours after the last consumption.

Alcohol Detox Timeline

A detox timeline of alcohol is mainly determined by the severity of the disease, the worse the addiction, the more severe the withdrawal symptoms will be, and the more likely it’s that they will stick around for longer.

During an alcohol detox a patient can expect to:

  • Receive a medical examination
  • Experience withdrawal symptoms
  • Take medication for symptoms
  • Receive around-the-clock support 

While some symptoms can last for weeks, the alcohol detox process is but a short journey, usually lasting between 7 and 10 days.

6 to 12 Hours After Discontinuing Consumption

Most alcohol withdrawal subjects will start experiencing discomfort between six to twelve hours after cessation, although severe addiction patients could begin to experience withdrawal symptoms as early as two hours after consuming their last drink. 

The first withdrawal symptoms will appear to be mild and progress as time passes without further consumption.

During the emergence period, the patient can expect to receive a medical examination if he or she has checked into a detox center, which will help the medical staff determine the conditions of their health and if there are any other issues present that may endanger the life of the patient.

After the examination is completed, the patient will be placed on medications that will help in managing the withdrawal symptoms.

The first symptoms that can be observed during the emergence phase of withdrawal include:

  • Tremors
  • Irritability
  • Sweating
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Hypertension and hyperventilation
  • Elevated heart rate
  • High body temperature
  • Alcohol cravings
  • Anxiety

12 to 24 Hours After Discontinuing Consumption

After the first symptoms develop and time progresses, the alcoholic will commence experiencing increasingly severe and dangerous symptoms of alcohol withdrawal such as:

  • Hallucinations
  • disorientation 
  • Seizures
  • Feeling pins and needles
  • Panic attacks
  • Depression

24 to 48 Hours After Discontinuing Consumption

With the arrival of the second-day hallucinations, panic attacks, and seizures tend to be more common. This is a sensible period where the patient enters a delicate medical condition. 

At this point, patients should be under constant supervision and can expect to have around-the-clock medical support from the detox staff.

3 to 7 Days After Discontinuing Consumption

Days three to seven tend to be the most severe and risky for the health of the recovering alcoholic. This is not only a debilitating period for their mental health but also for their physical health, risking the highest possibility of mortality.

During this period, delirium tremens, a life-threatening symptom, could lead to cardiac collapse. Statistics show that patients have a whopping 37% risk of mortality rate when the proper treatment is not provided.

8 Days After Discontinuing Consumption

The end of the detox timeline of alcohol brings with it a new window of opportunity, as seeing that many of the withdrawal symptoms start to fade away. In some cases, mild symptoms may persist for longer, but most of them can be treated with medication.

Where to Get Help

If you or a loved one is suffering from alcoholism then you can’t overestimate the need to get help! 

As data shows, detoxing with severe withdrawal symptoms can be life-threatening. Signing up for a detox program will shelter the alcoholic from the health risks that come with alcohol withdrawal, offering the protection and care of competent medical staff.

Now that you know what the detox timeline of alcohol is like, it’s time to take action.

Veritas Detox offers alcohol detox programs to help you or your loved ones get sober and stay that way.

Help is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas recovery experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. Contact Veritas Detox today!

What to Look for in a Detox Center

A detox center is a rehab facility that offers detox programs for addicts experiencing withdrawal symptoms from drugs and alcohol. As the name suggests, addicts attend a detox program to clean their system from addictive substances by “detoxifying” their system. The programs also provide the support needed for a healthy recovery and professional medical supervision. 

Detox centers are not all created equal, they employ different methodologies and range in features. Identifying a quality rehab can make all the difference between walking out into a new life or going back into the races.

 

Who Needs a Detox Center?

If stopping the consumption of drugs or alcohol causes withdrawal symptoms, then you are likely in need of a detox. A person who has developed a physical dependency on drugs will have a rather difficult time getting sober without attending a detox program. If symptoms are severe enough the life of the person seeking recovery could be at risk, as some withdrawal symptoms could be life-threatening.

The length of time a person needs to spend in detox will be dependent on their consumption and the degree to which their body heals, lasting anywhere between 24 hours and several days. 

What to Look For in a Detox Center

So you’ve decided detox is your thing or the thing needed for that person you care for, you pull a quick google search and type “how to find a drug detox center” – suddenly, you find yourself lost in the complex and sparse set of options available to you.

It’s a tough call, not only do you want to make sure you get yourself or that loved one on the right track, but you also want to make sure your dollars are well invested the first time around.

So then where do you start? 

First, you need to understand that a great detox center will help achieve three things:

  • Reduce substance abuse or achieve a substance-free life (Preferably the latter)
  • Maximize life functioning
  • Preventing or reducing the frequency and severity of relapses

Any center that offers those three solutions is a great start, but that’s not the whole pie. 

The Checkmarks

Understanding how to find a drug detox center that works starts with a few simple checkmarks. Let’s go over them.

  • Staff credentials: Please make sure that their doctor is actually a licensed doctor. The rehab website should offer information about their staff credentials that looks like this.
  • Access to Medical Care Onsite: Goes-without-saying. Detoxifying is a delicate process, it requires medical help beyond bandaids and aspirin. Make sure a doctor is available on site and that he or she has the right tools to support emergencies and detox treatments.
  • Program accreditation: Check that the program itself has been accredited by an official health organization such as JCAHO or CARF. These organizations follow rigorous standards that will ensure patients are being taken care of properly.
  • Financing:  You can’t put a price on life, let alone let a price tag on the right treatment center keep you from getting the right help. Medical treatments carry their costs and ensuring that a detox center has financing options, or that they take your medical insurance is an important step in planning your decision.
  • Support Programs: Support programs vary from in-house 12-step programs to alumni aftercare. These programs will be the life-support that ensures addicts stay away from relapsing long after they leave rehab. A detox center that does not offer some form of a support group should be a big red flag, stay away.
  • Tailored Solutions: Each person is different, which means each recovery journey is not going to be the same. Find a facility that offers tailored options.
  • Life Integration: After many years of addiction, it can be difficult to land back in the real world on your two feet. Therapy and life skills programs should be available to help addicts re-integrate into a new life. 
  • Zen space – Going to detox should feel a little bit like medical tourism. Getting yourself or your loved one into a comfortable space with good vibes can’t be overstated. Check what’s on the menu, look out for a gym in the facility, and give them extra points if they have yoga.

Making It Easy For You

Now that you know all there is to know about how to find a drug detox center, it’s time to take action.

Instead of browsing the web for countless treatment centers, you can go ahead and check out Veritas Detox.

Veritas checks all the boxes and excels at delivering exceptional detox treatments. Their ultra-well-equipped rehab facility is accredited by JCAHO and employs top-notch licensed professionals. Their in-house gym, yoga classes, and gourmet meals will make rehab feel more like a weekend in Cancun, than a visit to the doctor.Come detox with us. Contact Veritas Detox today for a free consultation.

Does Alcohol Cause Withdrawal Symptoms?

Does Alcohol Cause Withdrawal Symptoms?

When a substance with a high potential for dependency is abused it causes a physical dependence on the addict, and he or she may experience withdrawal symptoms after abruptly cutting down or stopping its consumption. The symptoms of withdrawal are not only unpleasant but could also be dangerous.

Alcohol is no exemption, like other drugs, alcohol can cause mild to severe withdrawal symptoms, charging a heavy toll on the body. The length of which it can vary depends on many factors, such as how much and how often alcohol is consumed.

What is Alcohol Withdrawal?

Alcohol can develop dependency after prolonged use, which leads heavy drinkers to experience withdrawal symptoms when consumption is stopped abruptly. 

We can’t understand what an alcohol withdrawal is without first examining how alcohol acts in the body. Alcohol acts as a depressant in the central nervous system, and after prolonged use, your nervous system starts getting used to having it around all the time. Because alcohol acts as a depressant, your body works overtime in keeping your brain sharp. After prolonged drinking, it becomes sort of a habit for your body to keep your brain ‘pumped up’. When alcoholics stop drinking, the brain and nervous system stay in this heightened state which is what causes the withdrawal.

This condition is known as ‘alcohol withdrawal syndrome’ and can be life threatening for the alcoholic. It’s symptoms range from mild to severe

What Are the Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal?

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms could start showing up in as little as a few hours after the last drink, depending on the level of dependency of the alcoholic. Mild symptoms of alcohol withdrawal are rarely dangerous, but can certainly be unpleasant and bothersome. 

The most common mild symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Agitation
  • Sweating
  • Visual and Auditory disturbances
  • Anxiety

On the other hand, more severe symptoms should not be ignored as these can lead to complications and even death. When these begin to appear, it’s important to seek the help of a medical professional.

Severe and life threatening symptoms may include – 

  • Delirium tremens
  • Seizures
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome
  • Anxiety
  • Depression and suicidal thoughts
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Hallucinations
  • Cardiovascular complications

Available Treatments

Understanding what is alcohol withdrawal, is but the first step, once the symptoms are noticed, is time to seek treatment. The best way to treat severe alcohol withdrawals is with the help of a healthcare professional. Detox and rehab centers assist alcoholics and treat their withdrawals with medications that alleviate their symptoms while maintaining 24/7 monitoring of patients.

Pharmacotherapy can be used to manage withdrawal symptoms, and meds such as benzodiazepines may be employed to help with anxiety, seizures, and insomnia. Other antipsychotics and anti-seizure meds are also available as part of the detox.

After the treatment is concluded, the patient should be referred to a support group such as AA, which can provide ongoing support that will be needed through the rest of an alcoholic’s life. Attending 12-step or other support programs during sobriety is an important step for maintenance to avoid relapses. In many cases, detox centers will also offer alumni groups and aftercare programs that will support the addict. Therapy during and after may also be a good option for those who have other underlying behavioral and cognitive issues that could allure them back to a bottle.

How to Get Help

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can hinder recovery by keeping alcoholics from wanting to stop drinking, they can be dangerous and life-threatening if not dealt with adequately.

If you or one of your loved ones is suffering from alcohol withdrawals then you must act now!

Veritas Detox offers alcohol detox programs to help you or your loved ones get sober and stay that way.

Help is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas recovery experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. Contact Veritas Detox today!

How to Detox Safely From Opioids

How to Detox Safely From Opioids

Opioids are chemical compounds that closely resemble the effects of Opium, commonly used as powerful painkillers. Because they are closely related, they also carry many of the addictive properties and harmful side effects of drugs like heroin. Contrary to popular belief, opioids are no safer than their illicit counterparts and should be handled only as directed by a doctor.

Opioid Addiction

Addiction to Opioids in the US has been on the rise and it’s now considered a health epidemic. There were over 16,000 overdoses involving opioids in 2020, a 16% increase from the previous year. 

To put that into perspective, around 932,000 people have died from drug overdoses in the US since 1999, which means that over 16% of all drug overdose deaths in the US since 1999 were caused by opioids in 2020 alone. That’s a huge number, and it shows the problem is serious and of concern to health officials and those whose loved ones may be suffering from opioid addiction.

Its imperative for addiction patients to receive proper detox treatment so they may avoid the worst of cases, but detoxing may not be as straightforward, opioid withdrawals can make it difficult for addicts to get clean. It’s important to learn how to detox from opioids safely, as the side effects of withdrawals can be dangerous and life-threatening.

Symptoms of Opioid Withdrawal 

Withdrawal symptoms may appear when users have developed a degree of dependence on the drug, and they may vary depending on factors such as how long and how much of the medication was taken.

Some symptoms might be mild and not life-threatening while others such as depression or Autonomic hyperactivity could be deadly. It’s always recommended to contact a recovery specialist prior to detoxing from opioids. If any of the signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawals are present in someone taking the medication, it’s important to contact their healthcare provider or call 911 if it’s an emergency.

Some of the common symptoms of opioid withdrawal include:

  • Excessive flow of tears
  • Muscle aches
  • Tremors
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Dilated pupils
  • Eye discomfort in bright lights
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Autonomic hyperactivity
  • Irritable moods
  • Depression and suicidal thoughts
  • Anxiety

How To Detox Safely From Opioids 

You don’t need to look too far to learn how to detox from opioids, many treatments are offered to treat their strong physical dependence on the body and its withdrawal symptoms. 

The best way to determine if a patient needs specialized treatment is by contacting a recovery specialist or consulting with a medical professional. Trying to play doctor at home could endanger the lives of our loved ones and put them at risk of a relapse.

Whether the patient attends an outpatient or inpatient treatment program, it’s likely that pharmacological management could be offered if the withdrawal is severe. There are three main medication choices to treat the addiction at this stage: Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone. These medications will be provided by recovery experts along with counseling to help alleviate withdrawal symptoms and nurse the addict back to good health. Other medicines may also be provided to alleviate withdrawal symptoms such as Clonidine to reduce blood pressure.

How To Get Help

Now that you know how to detox from opioids safely, it’s time to take action.

Opioid withdrawal symptoms can hinder recovery by keeping addicts from wanting to stop using, they can be dangerous and life-threatening if not dealt with adequately.

If you or one of your loved ones is suffering from opioid withdrawals then you must act now!

Veritas Detox offers opioid detox programs to help you or your loved ones get sober and stay that way.

Help is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas recovery experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. 

Contact Veritas Detox today!

What Are the Symptoms of Cocaine Withdrawal?

What are the Symptoms of Cocaine Withdrawal?

Cocaine is an illegal drug with a high potency that resembles a white powder. The drug acts quickly on the body, releasing an excess of chemicals in the brain that produce feelings of euphoria, which eventually leads to addiction and physical dependence. A cocaine withdrawal occurs when the addict stops consuming after a prolonged period of cocaine abuse. 

Understanding what are the withdrawal symptoms of cocaine and how to treat them is the first step in helping our loved ones achieve sobriety.

What Are the Health Risks Associated with Cocaine Addiction?

Using drugs is bad, we all know that – if they weren’t, they’d probably be legal. When it comes to cocaine, we are talking bad-bad, end-up-homeless or dead kind of bad. Cocaine’s-claws grip the ego and create a physical and psychological dependency that the addict can’t control.

One could point out countless tragedies that are caused by cocaine addiction; losing a job, having poor relations, being involved in accidents, becoming broke financially – all of which are considered to be “repairable” with sobriety; however, the point of main concern is the irreparable health damages that can be caused by cocaine abuse.

The most common health risks long-term cocaine exposure causes include:

  • Nose bleeds
  • Irreparable damage to nose cartilages
  • Respiratory infections 
  • Risk of dementia
  • Heart problems
  • Seizures
  • Stroke
  • Overdose and death

So if it’s not all fun and games and cocaine is so harmful then why is it abused so much?

The answer may be found in understanding what are the withdrawal symptoms of cocaine.

What Are the Withdrawal Symptoms of Cocaine?

Withdrawal symptoms occur when prolonged users stop taking cocaine abruptly. Symptoms of withdrawal from cocaine may last for days and can also be experienced in between doses. 

Short-Term Symptoms of Withdrawal From Cocaine

Cocaine acts quickly on the body releasing feelings of euphoria, the feelings, however, are short-lived. Shortly after dosing, the user experiences cravings which prompt him or her to take more cocaine, each time delivering less potency and requiring higher doses to reach the same high. With each passing dose, the cravings become more and more unmanageable, making it very difficult for an addict to stop. 

Short-term withdrawal symptoms such as the one described above are one of the main reasons why addicts have such a difficult time stopping, and why it’s recommended that detox from cocaine be managed by a recovery expert.

Aside from strong cravings, insomnia and anxiety are also frequent short-term withdrawal symptoms of cocaine use. Left to their own devices, cocaine addicts tend to resort to heavy drinking, or taking other depressants such as sleep aids to help them combat the short-term withdrawal symptoms of cocaine.

Long-Term Symptoms of Withdrawal From Cocaine

Symptoms of withdrawal from cocaine may last anywhere from a couple of hours to a couple of days. Understanding what are the withdrawal symptoms of cocaine can help us better gauge when it’s time to seek professional help.

Symptoms of a cocaine withdrawal include:

  • Agitation
  • Depression and suicidal thoughts
  • Fatigue
  • Feelings of discomfort (Uncomfortable in one’s own skin)
  •  Increase in appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Vivid and unpleasant dreams
  • Slowing of activity

Given some of these symptoms may be life-threatening, its best to get professional help as soon as they are noticed.

Where To Get Help

If a loved one is experiencing short or long-term symptoms of cocaine withdrawal then it’s important to get them into a drug treatment center to prevent severe health risks from developing. 

Now that you know what are the withdrawal symptoms of cocaine, it’s time to take action.

Veritas Detox offers cocaine detox programs to help you or your loved ones get sober and stay that way.

Help is available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week at no cost or obligation. Speak to one of Veritas recovery experts, to seek the help you and your loved ones need. 

Contact Veritas Detox today!

How Long Does It Take to Detox From Alcohol?

Alcohol can become highly addictive in just a short amount of time. If you suddenly stop drinking alcohol after excessive use, you can experience severe withdrawal symptoms that may start just a few hours after your last drink.

As uncomfortable as it may be, it’s important to go through this process if you want to start a new leaf and begin living a life of sobriety. The good news is that there is a safer and more comfortable way to detox. 

With the help of detox professionals, you can detox from alcohol in a safe and comfortable manner, but how long will the process take?

How long does it take an alcoholic to detox? Scroll down to find out. 

How Long Does Detox From Alcohol Take? 

Answering the question, “How long does detox from alcohol take?” is difficult because it varies on a number of factors. How long you have been drinking alcohol, how much is in your system, and any other substances that are present impact the time frame.

Even so, most people detox from alcohol for about four to five days after their last drink. In most cases, withdrawal symptoms peak on the third day and subside entirely by the fifth day. 

Unfortunately, some people experience persistent withdrawal symptoms for months after their last drink, though it often occurs in severe cases or cases where other substances are used.

How Long Does Detoxing From Alcohol Take vs Other Substances 

Detoxing from alcohol is often a shorter process than detoxing from other substances. However, the detox process is often more severe and comes with more serious risks when detoxing from alcohol. It’s important to always detox with the help of a trained professional as a result.

What to Expect During Detox from Alcohol 

You may begin to experience withdrawal symptoms just a few hours to a few days after your last drink. The severity of your addiction will largely impact how soon you begin feeling symptoms. For most individuals, symptoms appear 12 to 24 hours after their last drink.

Once withdrawal symptoms appear, they will gradually get worse until they peak. Most individuals experience peak withdrawal symptoms around three days after their last drink. That peak will begin to come down. Most do not experience any more withdrawal symptoms four to five days after their last drink, though some may experience symptoms until seven days after their last drink.

In severe cases, alcohol withdrawal symptoms can last longer than seven days. These cases are rare and often occur whenever alcohol is mixed with other substances.

Dangers of Detoxing from Alcohol Alone 

Although detoxing from alcohol is a shorter process than detoxing from other substances, it’s important to always detox at a medical facility. Detoxing from alcohol by yourself is painful, dangerous, and often ineffective.

The symptoms of alcohol detox are super uncomfortable, which causes many individuals to turn back to drinking shortly after attempting detox. Some individuals may have enough willpower to fight through these symptoms, but some symptoms are fatal.

For example, one of the more severe side effects of alcohol withdrawal is delirium tremens. This side effect is fatal and 5% to 15% of patients. Because of how dangerous these side effects are, it’s best to always detox from alcohol with professionals.

Detox Safely with Veritas Detox 

How long does detox from alcohol take? Most people detox from alcohol within a week of their last drink, but the process ultimately depends on your case.

Veritas Detox can help you detox from alcohol in a safe and comfortable way. Contact our facility today to learn more about our medical detox program.

How to Admit Someone to Drug Rehab

Addiction is something that impacts homes throughout our nation. Whenever just one person suffers from substance use disorder, the entire family suffers alongside them. One of the most painful situations trying to encourage the addict to receive treatment.  

You most likely know from experience and advice that the best thing to do is to confront an individual who suffers from addiction. In some cases, confrontations may encourage the addict to seek addiction treatment on their own. Unfortunately, this does not always lead to the result you want.

If you have confronted your loved one and they still refuse treatment, you might be wondering how to admit someone to rehab. Is it even possible to force someone to go to rehab? These are important questions to ask when dealing with a loved one who refuses help.

Can You Force Someone to Go to Rehab? 

In some circumstances, yes. You can force someone to go to rehab and detox. However, there are very specific instances when this is allowed.

If a minor or person under the age of 18 is addicted, most facilities and laws allow for parents to commit their child to a rehab facility without the child’s consent.

Once an individual is over the age of 18, things get more complicated. There are times when you can force someone to go to rehab without their consent even if they are a legal adult. However, there are only a few scenarios in which a person can be forced into rehab without going willingly.

How to Get Someone Admitted to Rehab 

If you have a loved one over the age of 18 who refuses SUD treatment, you might be asking how to admit someone to rehab. In that case, there are two main options available: the drug court system or involuntary commitment.

Through the Court System 

Drug courts are designed to help nonviolent offenders avoid prison and receive treatment instead. In these cases, the goal for the criminal is treatment instead of punishment. In order to go through the court system, your loved one must have been arrested and pleaded guilty. They must have agreed to their court-ordered treatment program as well. 

Involuntary Commitment 

Involuntary commitment is exactly what it sounds like. It is whenever an individual is committed to substance use disorder treatment without their consent. This treatment is legal in 37 States and DC. Within these locations, individuals can be involuntarily committed if they meet the criteria that their local government lays out for involuntary commitment. In the other states, involuntary commitment is simply not an option.

What If My Loved One Doesn’t Qualify? 

Unfortunately, options are limited when it comes to having an adult admitted into a rehab facility without their consent. If your loved one does not meet the requirements for court-ordered treatment or involuntary commitment, there is no way to force them to receive substance use treatment.

The best thing you can do is talk to a licensed counselor to find out some ways that you can support your loved one without enabling them in the process. Continue to encourage them to seek treatment and help them find the means to do so.

Help Your Loved One Start a New Life with Veritas Detox 

How to admit someone to rehab? The only two options are through drug court or involuntary commitment for adults. Minors under the age of 18 can be committed by their parents without the child’s consent.

If your loved one is struggling with addiction, contact Veritas Detox today. Our treatment facility can help you throughout this process and hopefully help your loved one receive the medical treatment they need to overcome their addiction.